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Staff profile: Patrizia Sione

LibeScope - Wed, 2014-02-19 14:02

Helping students appreciate the complexity of the human record.

Who she is: Patrizia Sione, research archivist at the Kheel Center, which is part of the the Hotel, Labor and Management Library.

What she does: I answer reference questions and coordinate public services for the Kheel Center, and I’m the editor of the Triangle Fire website.

I also teach courses at ILR. This spring, I’m teaching a sophomore writing class: “Uncovering Corporate Strategies: Case Studies from the 20th Century.” This course focuses on managers's sense of identity of themselves and of workers, and examines how this sense of identity affects relations in the workplace. The course will be writing intensive, and I’m excited to help ILR students meet this writing requirement in a new and interesting way.

Why it’s important: My job is all about helping people — students, scholars, the public —appreciate history and the wonderful complexity of the human record.

Where she comes from: I was born in a town called Udine in northeastern Italy, on the other side of the Alps from Austria.

I attended the University of Trieste, near where I grew up. I had a great American professor there who made me appreciate how different and fascinating American history was. It felt like an intellectual adventure!

Education: When I realized I wanted to study U.S. history, I decided to drop everything and come to the United States. I enrolled in a master’s program at Syracuse and got my Ph.D. from Binghamton, studying American history with a concentration in immigration and labor.

And then, going into the archival professional was a logical next step, because I love working with primary sources and facilitating the knowledge of history in others.

Years at Cornell: In 1994 and1995, I was a visiting assistant professor at ILR, teaching the labor history survey and electives in women’s history and immigration history. I came back to Cornell in 1997 to work for the Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections for two years, doing some processing, cataloging and reference work. Then this job at the Kheel Center opened up and I applied for it. It was perfect for me.

Most memorable moment: A few years ago, a high school student working on a National History Day project was really moved by the personal stories she read on the Triangle Fire website. She asked me some reference questions over email and I helped her find some sources, and we had several back-and-forth conversations.

Then she told me she’d decided to apply to ILR because our website introduced her to labor history and social justice, and she was accepted! When she was here, we continued to talk and she got a job at the Kheel Center. She became part of our family, part of the ILR family.

Best part of her job: Seeing the spark of discovery and excitement in a student’s eyes.

In her spare time: I love gardening, bird-watching, hiking… I’m an outdoors kind of person. But I also love to read science fiction — I’ve been reading it since I was 10 years old!

Dream job: Of course I really like my job here, but I would love to be a science-fiction writer!

In this LibeScope series, interviews with library staff reveal their skills, talents, interests and backgrounds.

LibeScope
  • Staff profile: Chew Chiat Naun

    How is cataloging similar to philosophy and engineering? Who he is: Chew Chiat Naun, director of cataloging and metadata... more

     
  • Staff profile: Patrizia Sione

    Helping students appreciate the complexity of the human record. Who she is: Patrizia Sione, research archivist at the Kheel... more

     
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Categories: LibeScope

Staff profile: Chew Chiat Naun

LibeScope - Wed, 2014-02-19 13:51

How is cataloging similar to philosophy and engineering?

Who he is: Chew Chiat Naun, director of cataloging and metadata services

What he does: I manage the Library’s cataloging and metadata services unit in Library Technical Services.. We construct and manage metadata to make our collections accessible to a variety of users.

It’s sort of like an engineering job. You know your tools, your materials, your standards, your technology, and you try to build a framework that’s going to last. You’re creating something that will work over time in a range of environments and for a range of foreseeable and unforeseen uses. You try to do that within your time and budget constraints, and you try to build something that’s going to stand up. That’s how I think about my job.

Why it’s important: We have these great collections that are either unique, not held by anyone else, or perhaps are held widely and are in great demand. Our unit makes sure people know about these collections, both here at the university and elsewhere, so that people can use what we have and will continue to do so into the future.

Where he comes from: I was born in Australia, but I grew up in Malaysia and spent my childhood there. After that, my parents decided to return to Australia. I came to the United States about 12 years ago.

Background: I’ve always liked travel and hoped for a chance to work overseas, and coming here was a great opportunity. Australia is a long way from anywhere, so living here gives me a great opportunity to travel more and see more places.

Education: I have a library degree and a master’s degree in philosophy from Monash University in Australia. I think there’s a good affinity between what catalogers do and what philosophers do. It’s thinking systematically and analytically about things, and sometimes looking at a problem in perhaps not the most obvious way – that’s part of the appeal of my job.

Years at Cornell: I’ve been here seven months now. My experience so far is that it’s a very healthy organization where people work well together and get a lot done.

Best part of his job: I can only give a boring answer to that, which is that this is such a talented group of people. They work very well together. It’s part of the reason I went into libraries in the first place — they tend to be full of nice people who care deeply about their work.

In his spare time: I lead a quiet life. Though I’m not a musician, listening to classical music is very important to me. Lately I’ve been listening to a lot of Bach and Beethoven. I’m fine with small-town life, and Ithaca is not so small you can’t get the things you need. I like being close to New York City, too. It’s the best of both worlds.

Dream job: I never dreamt about some particular job. I’ve been very lucky with the ones I’ve had.

In this LibeScope series, interviews with library staff reveal their skills, talents, interests and backgrounds.

LibeScope
  • Staff profile: Chew Chiat Naun

    How is cataloging similar to philosophy and engineering? Who he is: Chew Chiat Naun, director of cataloging and metadata... more

     
  • Staff profile: Patrizia Sione

    Helping students appreciate the complexity of the human record. Who she is: Patrizia Sione, research archivist at the Kheel... more

     
$(document).ready(function () { $('div.we-recommend h2:first').replaceWith('More recommendations   (Full Archive)'); });
Categories: LibeScope